Knee

Normal Anatomy of the Knee Joint

The knee is made up of four bones. The femur or thighbone is the bone connecting the hip to the knee. The tibia or shinbone connects the knee to the ankle. The patella (kneecap) is the small bone in front of the knee and rides on the knee joint as the knee bends. The fibula is a shorter and thinner bone running parallel to the tibia on its outside. The joint acts like a hinge but with some rotation.

For more information about Normal Anatomy of the Knee Joint, click on below tabs.

Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative joint disease is the most common form of arthritis. It occurs most often in older people. This disease affects the tissue covering the ends of bones in a joint (cartilage).In a person with osteoarthritis, the cartilage becomes damaged and worn out causing pain, swelling, stiffness and restricted movement in the affected joint. This condition most commonly affects the joints in hips, knees, hands, and spine. Rarely, the disease may affect the shoulders, wrists and feet.

For more information about Osteoarthritis of the Knee, click on below tabs.

Knee Pain

The knee is one of the largest joints in the body, formed by the lower end of the femur, upper end of the tibia and the patella or knee cap. Several ligaments and muscles attach to the bones of the knee joint to maintain normal motion of the joint. Special cartilaginous tissues known as menisci are placed between the two articular ends of the joint. These act as a cushion between the articular surfaces and absorb the shock during movement.

For more information about Knee Pain, click on below tabs.

Fractures of the Knee

A fracture is a condition in which there is break in the continuity of the bone. In younger individuals these fractures are caused from high energy injuries, as from a motor vehicle accident. In older people the most common cause is weak and fragile bone.

For more information about Fractures of the Knee, click on below tabs.

Knee Replacement

Total knee replacement, also called total knee arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure in which the worn out or damaged surfaces of the knee joint are removed and replaced with artificial parts. The knee is made up of the femur (thigh bone), the tibia (shin bone), and patella (kneecap). The meniscus, the soft cartilage between the femur and tibia, serves as a cushion and helps absorb shock during motion. Arthritis (inflammation of the joints), injury, or other diseases of the joint can damage this protective layer of cartilage, causing extreme pain and difficulty in performing daily activities. Your doctor may recommend surgery if non-surgical treatment options have failed to relieve the symptoms.

For more information about Knee Replacement, click on below tabs.

Revision Knee Replacement

Revision knee replacement surgery involves replacing part or all of your previous knee prosthesis with a new prosthesis. Although total knee replacement surgery is successful, sometimes the procedure can fail due to various reasons and require a second revision surgery.

For more information about Revision Knee Replacement, click on below tabs.

Treatment of Infections

Septic arthritis, also called as infectious arthritis, is characterized by joint inflammation due to a bacterial or fungal infection that usually affects the large joints of the body such as knee or hip. Normally, fluid lubricating a joint, called synovial fluid, is aseptic in nature. But with septic arthritis, microbes can grow in the affected joint fluid and make the condition worse.

For more information about Treatment of Infections, click on below tabs.

Click on the topics below to find out more from the orthopedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.

351 Hospital Rd #309, Newport Beach, CA 92663
Phone: 949 642 5600 | Fax: 949 642 5355

Locate Us

X

Tell a Friend

captcha